Showing 182 results

Authority record

Kelly, Michael

  • 003
  • Person
  • 1953 -

Michael Kelly was born in Sudbury Ontario in 1953 and attended Laurentian University from 1973 to 1978. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in History and then matriculated to the University of Toronto (1979-1985) for his Master of Arts in History. During this time, he was asked to write a chapter in an upcoming local Sudbury history book to help celebrate the one hundred anniversary of the founding of Sudbury. The book was divided up into decades and Michael Kelly was assigned 1900-1910. This chapter was later completed by Ashley Thompson and the book was published ten years after its intended publication date in 1993 entitled Sudbury Rail Town to Regional Capital.

Other books Kelly worked on while a student at Laurentian include Inventory and Guide to Historic Building in Sudbury, 1978.

From 1979 to 1985, Kelly traded commercial paper and foreign exchange securities as part of a corporate cash management team with INCO Limited. From 1985 to 1986 he was a regional economic development officer in Northern Ontario and from 1986-1989 he operated as a training consultant for various companies. From 1990 to the present, Kelly has worked as a professor at Cambrian College specializing in Human Relations, Ethics and Project Management.

Grace, George

  • 004
  • Person
  • 1917 - 2007

George Grace was born January 15, 1917. He moved to Sudbury, Ontario from Toronto on December 15, 1939 and began work as a sports reporter for The Sudbury Star in 1942. After serving in World War II, Grace returned to reporting for The Sudbury Star. During the 1950's, Grace developed polio which left his right hand atrophied and forced him into a wheelchair for several years. With the help of his wife Isobel, his condition improved and he continued writing sports articles. Grace was eventually promoted to Executive Editor before retiring in 1980. Ten years later, Grace began a regular sports column entitled 'Looking Back' which ran for about a decade. His final article appeared in the paper December 31, 2000. George Grace passed away December 23, 2007 at the age of 90.

Canada Packers

  • Corporate body
  • 1927-1990

Canada Packers, Inc. (now Maple Leaf Foods, Inc.) was a Toronto-based meat packing and processing company.

The company was formed out of a succession of mergers with predecessor companies. These include the William Davies Company, Ltd. (est. 1854), the Canadian Packing Company, Ltd. (est. 1868 as the George Matthews Company), Gunns Ltd. (est. 1876), and the Harris Abattoir Company, Ltd. (est. 1896). These firms merged in 1927 to form Canada Packers, Ltd., which became Canada Packers Inc. in 1980. In 1990 Canada Packers Inc. merged with British based Maple Leaf Mills, Ltd. to form Maple Leaf Foods, Inc.

Lasky, Leslie

  • U233
  • Person
  • fl 1964-1968

Leslie Lasky was a student at Waterloo Lutheran University in Business Administration from 1964 to 1968. He lived in Willison Hall and served as a residence Don. In 1967, he was elected as student representative to the Selection Committee for a new president of the University.

Schofield, Marcia

  • S738
  • Person
  • fl. 1947-1950

Marcia Schofield was a student at Waterloo College (now Wilfrid Laurier University) from 1947 to 1950.

Copp, Terry

  • S1002
  • Person
  • 1938 -

Terry Copp was born in 1938 and grew up in the Montreal suburb of Notre Dame de Grace. He attended Sir George Williams University (now Concordia) where he earned his bachelor’s degree. His career as an educator began prior to graduation when, in his third year, a teaching position at the University. As a condition of his employment, he was required to graduate before the beginning of classes in September and enroll in the Master of Arts program at McGill. After his year of teaching at Sir George Williams, he taught history at Westmount Junior High School. While there, he became concerned about the conditions at a local residential house where a number of his students lived, known as Weredale House. When he had a letter outlining his views published in the Montreal Star, many supporters of Weredale were upset and Copp left his position with the school board.

Copp completed his MA in 1961 and soon after was accepted into the PhD program at McGill. After a realization that his thesis would not work out, he took a job at a high school in Lindsay Ontario as an emergency replacement geography teacher. After this, was offered a full-time position teaching history at Loyola College and part-time teaching courses at McGill. He became a full-time faculty member at Loyola for the 1965/66 academic year while still teaching the Canadian history survey at McGill.

In 1968, Copp married and became a father to two step-children and later a third. In 1970, he took a position at Sir George Williams, which led to a year-long position as visiting professor at the University of Victoria. While in this position he was able to complete much of the manuscript for what became The Anatomy of Poverty: The Condition of the Working Class in Montréal 1897-1929, which was published in 1974. In 1975, Copp and his family left Montreal when he took up a position at Wilfrid Laurier University. In 1980, Copp’s research interest shifted from labour history to military history. He has published extensively in this area of study, including the five-volume Maple Leaf Route series with Robert Vogel, and numerous articles in Canadian Military History and other journals. In 1991, Copp and Marc Kilgour were awarded a grant from the Security and Defense Forum to finance what became the Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies.

Copp has been involved in numerous projects outside of the university. He has served as a research director and on-camera historian for the television documentary series “No Price Too High”, which was produced in response to the controversy caused by the CBC’s “The Valour and the Horror”. He was involved in the Canadian Battle of Normandy Foundation raising money for a Canadian Memorial Garden and student bursaries.

Copp retired in 2005 and is currently professor emeritus of history and director of the Laurier Centre for Military, Strategic and Disarmament Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University. He also writes a series of feature articles that have been published in Legion Magazine since 1994.

Keir, Robert John

  • 006
  • Person
  • 1931 - Present

Robert John Keir was born in Port Colborne, Ontario, on April 15th, 1931. While Keir's British grandfather was a professional journalist, Keir himself never recieved formal training in journalism; instead, he developed and honed his journalistic skills through years of on-the-job experience. Keir began his journalism career at an early age as a paperboy for the Globe & Mail. As an adult, Keir began writing for The Evening Tribute of Welland, Ontario, from 1950-1952. It was also during this time that Keir was given the opportunity to work as a “stringer”, writing additional local stories for large media outlets The Toronto Star and the Buffalo Courier-Express. In 1954, Keir became an out-island feature writer for The Nassau Guardian of Nassau, Bahamas, under a six-month contract. When his contract expired that same year, Keir relocated to Sudbury, Ontario. Once in Sudbury, Keir continued to pursue his journalistic interests, covering local affairs for The Sudbury Star from 1954 until 1956. From 1956 to 1957, Keir reported City Hall proceedings for CKSO Radio and Television and from 1957 to 1959, reported these proceedings for The Sudbury Star.

In 1955, Keir was appointed Northern Ontario Correspondent for The Globe and Mail and retained this freelance position for more than ten years. In 1959, Keir founded the Northern Information Service Company Limited in Sudbury, Ontario. As General Manager, Keir played a participatory role in handling freelance news coverage, public relations, advertising, and photography until he ended the company in 1970. In addition, Keir was one of the founders of The Sudbury Sun in 1962, serving as publisher and editor.

By the early 1960’s, Bob Keir had become an active supporter of local interests. This resulted in a shift in career interests, which saw Keir serve as Public Relations consultant for the City of Sudbury from 1960-1961. Keir served one term as Alderman (1964-1965), and despite not continuing as an elected member of city council, Keir stayed on as a volunteer, serving on various community committees (such as the Sudbury Planning Board and the Parking Authority of Sudbury). Keir moved to Toronto in 1970 to work as Senior Communications Manager for the Ministries of Environment, Natural Resources, and Energy at Queen’s Park, but returned to Sudbury in 1982 to serve as Executive and Communications Officer for Regional Chairman Tom Davies until Keir’s retirement in 1995.

After retiring, Keir continued to publicly voice his concerns over local issues. As one of seven members of the Greater Sudbury Municipal Watch since discussion of Sudbury’s amalgamation began in the late 1990’s, Keir monitors key issues at City Hall. Other local initiatives Keir has been involved in include the Sudbury Community Foundation (as a founding director) and the Sudbury Regional Restructuring Association (as a founder and secretary). In 1992, Keir was awarded the Canada 125 Commemorative Medal for his volunteer efforts and the Ontario 15 Years Voluntarism Award. Additionally, Keir provides regular published insights in letters to the editor for The Sudbury Star.

Dudowich, Michael

  • 012
  • Person
  • 1927 - 1998

Michael Dudowich was born January 31st, 1927 in Garson, Ontario. As a young student, Dudowich began working on the weekends for Mr. W.E. Mason at the Sudbury Star in 1943. In high school, Dudowich was the Director of Photography for the Sudbury High yearbook the Wolfhound as well as Assistant Editor for the Catholic Youth Organization Bulletins affiliated with St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church. In the 1946 Sudbury High yearbook, grade twelve student Dudowich stated his future goal for later in life was to photograph actress Lana Turner.

In 1947, the Dudowich family moved from Garson to Riverside Drive, Sudbury, Ontario. After graduating with honours from Sudbury High School, Dudowich worked for a short time as a locomotive fireman and then proceeded to work full time for the newspaper. Eventually, he became the photographic supervisor for the Sudbury Star and held the position of 'Chief Photographer' for decades prior to his retirement in May, 1976.

Dudowich was an active member of the Commercial and Press Photographers' Association of Canada (CPPAC) for many years. He frequently attended the short course in photography held annually at the University of Western Ontario by the group and won multiple awards for his photographs including the CPPAC Award of Merit and several of the Canadian Press Picture-of-the-Month awards. He was chosen Best Photographer of Canada, and his work appeared in the publication "America." In 1972, Dudowich received awards from the Canadian Government and the Canadian Press for his work in the Russian/Canadian Hockey Series of that year.

Dudowich was a charter member of the Idylwylde Golf and Country Club, a member of the Ukrainian Congress of Canada, the Laurentian Museum and Arts Centre and St. Mary's Ukrainian Catholic Church.

Michael Dudowich passed away on May 4th, 1998 at the age of 71.

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