Showing 181 results

Authority record

Theberge, John B., 1940-

  • S099
  • Person
  • 1940 -

John Theberge (1940- ) was a professor and researcher in the Faculty of Environmental Studies, University of Waterloo, from 1972 until his retirement in 2000. Theberge received his BSc from the University of Guelph, MSc from the University of Toronto, and PhD from the University of British Columbia. John Theberge's career focused on his wolf research, pioneering a technique using vocal patterns to identify wolves. John Theberge and his co-researcher and wife Mary Theberge became Canada's premier timber wolf research team, receiving international recognition for their field research. In 1993, Equinox magazine proclaimed John and Mary Theberge "Environmentalist of the Year". In 1998 they were presented with the Harkin Medal from Canadian Parks and Wilderness Services.

The Wartime Prices and Trade Board

  • CGSA-AC0099
  • Corporate body
  • 1939 - 1951

The Wartime Prices and Trade Board is a former Canadian government agency, established on September 3, 1939, by the Mackenzie King government, under the authority of the War Measures Act, in the Department of Labour responsible for price controls and inflation control. The board was abolished in 1951, upon the lapse of the Continuation of Transitional Measures Act, 1947.

The Canadian Bank of Commerce, Sudbury Branch No. 1335

  • 032
  • Corporate body
  • 1929-1961

The Canadian Bank of Commerce was first established on May 15, 1867 in Toronto, Ontario. Through amalgamations with regional banks, it grew to include branches across the country. With additional acquisitions in the 1920's, the bank became one of the strongest branch networks in Canada with well over 700 locations by 1929.

In 1936 the Canadian Bank of Commerce was the first bank in Canada to establish a personal loans department. At first, the bank would only issue loans, for a maximum of $1,000, in the Toronto and Hamilton areas. After the success of this pilot project, loans were extended to Canadians across the country.

During the second world war, the Canadian Bank of Commerce, along with other banks across Canada, assisted the government with the implementation of Victory Loans and War Ration coupons. The Victory Loan campaigns raised around $12 billion for the war effort, with almost three million Canadians buying war loan bonds. With the war ration coupons, banks became responsible for the accounting of food ration coupons in March, 1943 and gasoline ration coupons in April, 1944. The federal government first introduced ration coupons in April, 1942 for gasoline (until Aug 1945) and for certain food products in June, 1942 as a way of insuring equitable distribution of these supplies because of an acute shortage during the war. (Sugar - June 1942-1947, tea - 1942-Sept 1944, coffee - 1942-Sept 1944, butter - Dec 1942 -June 1947, meat - May 1943-March 1947, preserves - Dec 1943-1947, and in some areas evaporated milk - Dec 1943-1947.) After the initial year, the government decided banks in Canada were in a better position to handle the accounting aspect of the ration coupons and the banks agreed, provided they were able to limit the amount of paperwork involved. Dealers such as jobbers and brokers, wholesalers, creamery and cheese factories, importers of tea and coffee, retailers whose normal monthly gross sales in food exceeded $5,000, as well as businesses which served meals including the rationed goods, such as hotels, restaurants, and hospitals, were required to conduct ration bank accounts. With the ration bank accounts, these dealers and food server businesses would deposit and withdraw ration stamps in the same manner as financial accounts. Each ration product required a separate account for these businesses. When ration supplies were needed, a business would simply write a cheque in the amount of the ration stamps required from their specific product ration account. In turn, when customers purchased a rationed product, they would hand the business the required number of stamps and they would then deposit them into the specific ration accounts for their next purchase from their suppliers (both the businesses and the public were still required to pay cash for their rationed products along with the ration stamps.)

After the war, the Canadian Bank of Commerce increased their holdings to include branches in newly created suburbs and in 1954, along with the rest of the banks in Canada, began to offer mortgages for newly constructed homes. Prior to this time, all banks were barred from the mortgage business since 1871, leaving life insurance companies to offer the majority of mortgages to the public.

On June 1st 1961, the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce was formed through the merger of The Canadian Bank of Commerce and the Imperial Bank of Canada. The merger occurred due to both banks growth in the resource industry. The Imperial Bank of Canada was unable to keep up with the increasing needs of its resource industry clients and in an attempt to meet these needs and to ward off a possible buyout by a foreign bank, a new, larger bank was formed by the merger.

The Sudbury Branch of the Bank of Commerce first opened on June 22, 1929. Located on the corner of Elm and Elgin in the former Sterling Bank of Canada building, this bank became the eighth to locate to Sudbury (The Sterling Bank of Canada 1905-1924, opened January 30, 1909 in Sudbury. This bank merged with the Standard Bank of Canada in 1924 and the Standard Bank of Canada merged with the Canadian Bank of Commerce in 1928). The Town of Sudbury Building Permits record a H.R. Sheldon for Sterling Bank applying for a building permit on July 1, 1918 for 151 Elm Street. The building material included 80,000 bricks, 1,100 yards plastering, 1,000 cubic feet stone work, and 2,900 cubic feet concrete. This branch served as the main office in Sudbury until a larger branch was opened at the corner of Cedar and Lisgar Streets. As the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, the Elm and Elgin branch merged with the Cedar Street branch on October 24, 1997, leaving the Elm and Elgin Street location vacant.

Stowe-Gullen, Augusta, 1857-1943

  • S007
  • Person
  • 1857-1943

Ann Augusta Stowe-Gullen (1857-1943) was a medical doctor, a lecturer and a suffragette. She was born in Mt. Pleasant, Ontario, the daughter of John Stowe and Emily Howard Jennings. She married John Benjamin Gullen in 1883. She died in Toronto. Stowe-Gullen was educated at the Toronto School of Medicine, then at the Faculty of Medicine at Victoria University, Toronto, where she became an M.D. in 1883, the first woman to graduate from a Canadian medical school. Immediately after graduating she was appointed Demonstrator in Anatomy at the Woman’s Medical College in Toronto (from 1894 onwards known as the Ontario Medical College for Women). In 1890 she was appointed Lecturer on Diseases of Children, subsequently Professor of Diseases of Children. She also served among the original staff members of Toronto Western Hospital (founded in 1896). Stowe-Gullen was a member of the Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons, the Ontario Social Service Council, the Senate of the University of Toronto where she represented women in the medical profession (1912-24), the Toronto Board of Education (1892-96), the University Women's Club, the Women's Art Association, the Women's Board at Toronto Western Hospital, and the Women's Canadian Club. She was also active in the suffrage, temperance and other social movements. She was among the founders of the National Council of Women in 1893, (President) of the Canadian Suffrage Association, (Vice-President) of the National Council of Women, and she succeeded her mother as President of the Dominion Women’s Enfranchisement Association in 1903. In 1935 she was awarded the Order of the British Empire.

Stowe, Emily Howard, 1831-1903.

  • S006
  • Person
  • 1831-1903

Emily Howard Jennings Stowe (1831-1903) was a teacher and principal, a medical doctor, and a suffragette. Educated at home, Stowe became a teacher in 1846 and graduated from the Provincial Normal School in Toronto, Canada West in 1854. In 1865 Stowe applied to study medicine at the University of Toronto, but was denied entry because she was a woman. Unable to pursue her education in Canada, she attended the New York Medical College for Women. After graduating in 1867, Stowe returned to Toronto to practice medicine without a license. In 1870 she was allowed to attend the University of Toronto and was granted a medical license in 1880. In 1877 Emily Stowe organized Canada's first suffrage organization, initially called the Toronto Women's Literary Club, which later became the Toronto Women's Suffrage Club.

Stevens Family

  • 021
  • Family
  • 1902 - present (in Canada)

Robert Thomas Stevens [Roberto Tomaso Stefanizzi] was born in Cellara, Cosenza, Calabria, Italy on February 23, 1896 to Gaetano Stefanizzi and Gaetana Caliguiri. At the age of 6, he immigrated to Canada with his uncle Francesco Steffanzzi (aka Frank Stevens d. 1941 age 70) in 1902 while the rest of his family remained in Italy.

As a teenager during the first world war, Stevens operated a commissary at Nobel for the explosives plant employees. Stevens enjoyed being an entrepreneur and in 1918, he decided to venture into the film industry by opening his first theatre in Sudbury on Elm Street East. His theatre business thrived and over the years, Stevens expanded his business with the acquisition of additional theatres in Sturgeon Falls, Creighton Mine and Sault Ste. Marie. For a few years, Stevens also owned a theatre in Espanola. In August 1939, Stevens opened the large Regent Theatre on Elm Street in Sudbury. This theatre was well known for its size in Northeastern Ontario.

On December 4, 1923, Robert Stevens married Florence Boucher, a nurse originally from Whitefish, Ontario. The ceremony was held in Little Current, Ontario. They had six children; Joseph 'Robert' Guy (1924-1968), 'William' Alfred (1926-1988), 'Thomas' Joseph (1928-), Anne Marie (1930-2004, married name Ripley), John (1931?-), and Margaret Theressa (1934-).

During the second world war, Robert Stevens, along with many other Italian-born Canadians, was closely monitored by authorities. On August 24, 1940, Stevens was a patient at St. Joseph’s Hospital, suffering from a slight ailment. At 10 a.m. he was arrested on charges, under the Defence of Canada Regulations, for during August 14 to 20, 1940 “making statements intended to, or likely to, prejudice recruiting, training, discipline and administration of His Majesty’s forces,” and “making statements intended to, or likely to, cause disaffection to His Majesty.” He was escorted from his hospital room to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police headquarters for questioning. Afterwards, he was taken to the courthouse. Stevens was denied bail by the Magistrate and placed in a prison cell at the Sudbury District Jail until his trial three days later. Stevens plead guilty to the first charge and was fined $25. The second charge was dropped.

Robert Thomas Stevens became ill in January 1943 and passed away at St. Joseph's Hospital in Sudbury on February 13, 1943 at the age of 46.

Steinberg, Israel "Irving"

  • 007
  • Person
  • 1919 - 2011

Israel "Irving" Steinberg was born January 16 1919 in Peterborough Ontario. Shortly after his birth he moved with his parents, Joseph and Leah Steinberg and his sister Rose Steinberg, to Sudbury Ontario where his father founded Toronto Bargain Stores. The Steinbergs lived in Sudbury until 1932 when they moved to Toronto. Joseph Steinberg died on July 14 1963, and Irving Steinberg as executor of his estate retained property in Sudbury until 1968 when it was expropriated by the city as part of a downtown urban development project. Irving Steinberg passed away on March 1, 2011.

Stapleton, James

  • S002
  • Person
  • 1941-2012

Jim Stapleton was a student at Waterloo Lutheran University (now Wilfrid Laurier University) from 1961 to 1965.

Stacey, Robert, 1949-2007

  • AGOAC00782
  • Person
  • 1949 - 2007

Robert Stacey was born on July 2, 1949, to Harold Stacey and Margaret Ellen West ("Peggy") Jefferys. He graduated from Northview Heights Secondary School in 1968, and went on to earn an Honours BA in English Literature at the University of Toronto in 1972. During the summers, he worked as a library assistant in the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections of the University of Toronto Library. After his graduation, he worked for several rare book dealers, and spent six months in England in 1973 working for A. Zwemmer Ltd., a book publisher and dealer. After returning to Canada, in September 1973 Stacey became the manager of Pan Gallery, where he organized exhibitions on posters, private-press ephemera, and more. With the assistance of a grant from the Ontario Arts Council, Stacey began researching Canadian art and writing reviews for Artmagazine and other publications. In 1975, he began first as an apprentice, and eventually as an editor for Dundurn Press. Over the next thirty years he would continue his work as a freelance writer, editor, researcher, consultant, and exhibition curator, and published many essays, reviews, criticisms, and studies on Canadian /art. He is often recognized for his photography research, which allowed the inclusion of images in many important publications. Among his many other notable achievements, Stacy was appointed the first Canadian Research Fellow in the National Gallery of Canada's Research Fellowship Program in 1991. Stacey died of liver failure on November 4, 2007, in Toronto.

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