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Authority record
Chemtura Canada Co./Cie.
035 · Corporate body · 2006 - 2017

Chemtura Corporation was a global corporation headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with its other principal executive office in Middlebury, Connecticut. The company focused on specialty chemicals for various industrial sectors, and these were transportation (including automotive), energy, agriculture, and electronics. Chemtura operated manufacturing plants in 11 countries, including Canada.

Chemtura Corporation was the successor to Crompton & Knowles Corporation, which was incorporated in Massachusetts in 1900 and engaged in the manufacture and sale of specialty chemicals beginning in 1954. Crompton & Knowles traces its roots to Crompton Loom Works incorporated in the 1840s. In 2005, Crompton acquired Great Lakes Chemical Company, Inc., of West Lafayette, Indiana, to form Chemtura Corporation. Additionally, Great Lakes Chemical Corporation still existed as a subsidiary company of Chemtura. On April 21, 2017, Chemtura was officially acquired by Lanxess for $2.1 billion in cash.

In Canada, Chemtura and its predecessor corporations operated a plant in Elmira, Ontario. Since 1941 the plant has undergone various name and ownership changes. From 1966-2000 the plant operated as Uniroyal Chemical, from 2000-2006 as Crompton Company, and on July 1, 2006 formally changed its name to Chemtura Canada Company.

016-.1 · Person · 1924 - 2000

Eeva Annikki Kantokoski was born May 8, 1924 in Alajärvi, Finland to Matias (Matti) Niilo Kantokoski (born 1901), and his wife Anna Milia (born 1903). The family name was shortened from Kantokoski to Koski, but it is unclear when exactly this occurred. Eeva Annikki and her parents immigrated to Canada in 1924. They arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia on August 2, 1924, and then settled in Sudbury, Ontario. In December 1925, Eeva Annikki’s brother, Veikko Vesa Matias Kantokoski (Koski) was born. Sometime after their arrival in Canada Eeva Annikki's name was changed to Ann Eva, though others often referred to her as Anne, Anni or Annie. The family's early years were spent in Sudbury, Ontario. After the death of their mother in 1933, Ann and her brother Veikko lived with their father in Sudbury during the summer months and their aunt Ida Marie (Koivula) Lehti in Oshawa during the winter. Ann completed her education in Sudbury, Ontario in 1939, and gained a High School Entrance Certificate, though she did not attend due to the cost. Once she completed her schooling in 1939 she found employment in domestic service for Mrs. J. Ferrier, in Sudbury. Between 1940 and 1941 she worked at Korpela's Grocery Store on Bancroft Drive, and Maki's Restaurant on Elgin Street in Sudbury, Ontario. In 1942, Ann moved to Malartic, Quebec to work in a bunkhouse and kitchen in a mining town. There she met Archie Chisholm, whom she married in Montreal on May 24, 1942. Their first child, Carl Richard, was born on December 24, 1943. When her husband was posted overseas during World War II, Ann returned to Sudbury to stay with relatives, and completed a Red Cross Volunteer Nursing Service course during that time. After the Second World War, Ann and Archie had two more children; Leslie Karen, born March 8, 1947, and Barry Neil, born October 8, 1955. While living in North-western Quebec, Ann contributed her time to the Protestant Elementary School Board and the Canadian Air Force Ground Observer Corps. In 1974, she separated from her husband and moved to Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. There she completed high school and went on to study nursing. She became a Certified Nursing Assistant, and obtained a post-graduate diploma in psychiatric nursing. Between 1976 and 1986 she worked at the Nova Scotia Hospital. Ann Eva Chisholm died on March 12, 2000 at the age of 74, and is buried in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.

Conn, Gordon, d. 1977
AGOAC00123 · Person · 1888-1977

Gordon Conn (ca.1888-1977) was an art collector and supporter of visual art in Toronto. He studied to be a musician and worked as a painter in his youth. Although he did not pursue a career as an artist, he maintained connections with many artists. He was a friend of the painter Kenneth Forbes (1892-1980) who painted Conn’s portrait in 1935. Together with Forbes, Gordon Conn founded the Ontario Institute of Painters devoted to the display of painting based on what Forbes called “traditional” art values. Conn turned over his studio in Wychwood Park in Toronto—The Little Gallery—to a series of one-man shows of its members. Near the end of his life, he donated paintings by artists represented in this collection to public art galleries in Ontario.

Cooke family
BHS0006 · Family · 1908-

Jacob Cooke was born in England in 1908 and emigrated to Canada in 1927, eventually settling in Burlington, Ontario. He worked as a carpenter’s helper for Pigott Construction (based in Hamilton, Ontario), and later specialized in the laying of hardwood floors. In 1935, he purchased a hand operated block making machine and began manufacturing concrete blocks in the evenings in a shed at the back of his home at 3 New Street (now 2109 New Street). The blocks were to be used as bases for Christmas trees that decorated Brant Street that Christmas season.

In 1937, he installed his first power-operated block machine. He purchased sand and gravel from Frank Scheer on St. Matthew’s Avenue. The demand for concrete blocks continued, so what had begun as a small cottage industry expanded to larger premises on St. Matthew’s Avenue in Aldershot, on lands purchased from George Filman. An adjacent 55 acre gravel pit provided the raw materials needed for the rapidly expanding operation.

Jacob Cooke purchased property in Aldershot, Oakville and Hamilton. He and employee Brant Coleman developed these properties and sold them to builders. In 1952, they developed the Glen Acres survey (Birdland) on the Filman property. The streets were named after birds in honour of William Filman, who used to have a bird sanctuary on the property. As the business expanded, Jacob Cooke purchased Joe DeLuca’s farm which became the site of the Cooke Business Park at 35 Plains Road E.

By 1953, J. Cooke Concrete Blocks was the largest producer of concrete blocks in Canada, each day producing enough to build 30 houses. The company was in operation around the clock and produced ten million eight-inch blocks per year. Jacob Cooke, retaining the land development company, sold the concrete block business in 1958. His son William (Bill) stayed on to manage the company with his brother Eugene Barrymore (Barry) as Plant Manager. The company was sold again in 1977 and 1998.

At the age of 62, Jacob Cooke visited family in Australia and decided to pursue opportunities there. Convincing his son Barry to join him, Jacob purchased, cleared and planted thousands of acres of land. Jacob Cooke died in Australia on 6 November 1976.

William Jacob Cooke (Bill) was born on Maple Avenue in Burlington on 1 June 1931. He and his brother Eugene Barrymore (Barry) attended Maplehurst Public School and Waterdown High School. Bill married Mary Elizabeth Gray (Bette) on 19 February 1955. Bill carried on the concrete block business after his father and brother moved to Australia, and also became involved with land development.

Some of the areas developed in Aldershot by the Cooke family are Birdland, Harbour Heights, Oaklands Estates, Fairwood Place West, and the Cooke Business Park adjacent to the former concrete block plant. The Cooke family developed over 800 residential lots in the Aldershot area. The property now known as Oaklands Estates on Burlington Bay was purchased by Jacob Cooke in the early 1950s and was later developed into a residential street by Bill. Bill lived at 160 Oaklands Park Court, the home he built there in 1959. In the Fairwood Acres survey on North Shore Boulevard, Bill named the streets after his children: Daryl, David, Lynn and Lee. Bill’s wife Mary died in 2000; he later married Louise Oates. He died in Burlington on 12 May 2005 at the age of 74.

Copp, Terry
S1002 · Person · 1938 -

Terry Copp was born in 1938 and grew up in the Montreal suburb of Notre Dame de Grace. He attended Sir George Williams University (now Concordia) where he earned his bachelor’s degree. His career as an educator began prior to graduation when, in his third year, a teaching position at the University. As a condition of his employment, he was required to graduate before the beginning of classes in September and enroll in the Master of Arts program at McGill. After his year of teaching at Sir George Williams, he taught history at Westmount Junior High School. While there, he became concerned about the conditions at a local residential house where a number of his students lived, known as Weredale House. When he had a letter outlining his views published in the Montreal Star, many supporters of Weredale were upset and Copp left his position with the school board.

Copp completed his MA in 1961 and soon after was accepted into the PhD program at McGill. After a realization that his thesis would not work out, he took a job at a high school in Lindsay Ontario as an emergency replacement geography teacher. After this, was offered a full-time position teaching history at Loyola College and part-time teaching courses at McGill. He became a full-time faculty member at Loyola for the 1965/66 academic year while still teaching the Canadian history survey at McGill.

In 1968, Copp married and became a father to two step-children and later a third. In 1970, he took a position at Sir George Williams, which led to a year-long position as visiting professor at the University of Victoria. While in this position he was able to complete much of the manuscript for what became The Anatomy of Poverty: The Condition of the Working Class in Montréal 1897-1929, which was published in 1974. In 1975, Copp and his family left Montreal when he took up a position at Wilfrid Laurier University. In 1980, Copp’s research interest shifted from labour history to military history. He has published extensively in this area of study, including the five-volume Maple Leaf Route series with Robert Vogel, and numerous articles in Canadian Military History and other journals. In 1991, Copp and Marc Kilgour were awarded a grant from the Security and Defense Forum to finance what became the Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies.

Copp has been involved in numerous projects outside of the university. He has served as a research director and on-camera historian for the television documentary series “No Price Too High”, which was produced in response to the controversy caused by the CBC’s “The Valour and the Horror”. He was involved in the Canadian Battle of Normandy Foundation raising money for a Canadian Memorial Garden and student bursaries.

Copp retired in 2005 and is currently professor emeritus of history and director of the Laurier Centre for Military, Strategic and Disarmament Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University. He also writes a series of feature articles that have been published in Legion Magazine since 1994.

Cram, Eva (nee Wolotko)
034 · Person · 1903-1987

Eva Wolotko was born in November 1903 to parents Anton Wolotko and Mary Fox Wolotko in Chapleau, Ontario. Wolotko had one brother, Joseph Wolotko (October 1910 - December 12, 1949, AKA Joe Wolotko), who played hockey for teams in Chapleau and Falconbridge, Ontario in the Nickel Belt League. In 1938 Eva Wolotko moved to Sudbury, Ontario and in 1940 she married Earle Cram (aka Erle C. Cram, Ernie Cram, 1907-1964), a firefighter and former lumber and construction worker. The marriage ceremony occurred in Wolotko's hometown of Chapleau but the couple lived in Sudbury. Eva Wolotko Cram had a career as a dressmaker and later as a school crossing guard. She belonged to St. Andrew the Apostle Roman Catholic Church and died on September 26, 1987 at the age of 83.

Curnoe, Greg, 1936-1992
AGOAC00560 · Person · 1936 - 1992

Greg Curnoe (1936-1992), artist, lived most of his life in London, Ontario. He studied at the Special Art Program at H.B. Beal Secondary in London (1954-1956), the Doon School of Fine Arts (June-October 1956), and the Ontario College of Art (1957-1960). Curnoe married Sheila Thompson in 1965, and the couple had three children, Owen, Galen and Zoe. From Curnoe's early years, his hometown of London became the focus of his life and work, and he attracted much attention to its flourishing art scene. In 1962, he organized the first happening and the first artist-run gallery (the Region Gallery) in Canada. Curnoe played a key role in the founding of the Nihilist Party (1963) and the Nihilist Spasm Band (1965). He began making stamp books in 1962, and has been considered the first maker of artists' books in Canada. He founded the Forest City Gallery in 1973. Curnoe took up competitive cycling in 1971, and it remained a passion and ingredient in his art-making for the rest of his life. Over the course of his career, Curnoe was awarded numerous Canada Council and Ontario Arts Council Grants. From 1964, Curnoe exhibited nationally; in 1969 he represented Canada at the Sao Paolo Bienal in Brazil, and in 1976 at the Venice Biennale. He died in a traffic accident while cycling in 1992. Curnoe was the subject of a National Gallery of Canada retrospective in 1980, and the AGO exhibition Greg Curnoe: Life & Stuff in 2001. His work is to be found in all of Canada’s major public collections, as well as many private and corporate collections.

Curnoe, Nellie, 1909-1999
AGOAC00069 · Person · 1909 - 1999

Nellie Olive Curnoe (née Porter, 1909-1999) was the mother of Canadian artist Greg Curnoe (1936-1992). She married Gordon Charles Curnoe (1909-1985) in 193- and had three children: Greg, Glen (b. 1939) and Lynda (b. 1943). For biographical information on Greg Curnoe, see the finding aid to the Greg Curnoe fonds at this library, or Judith Rodger’s chronology in the 2001 Art Gallery of Ontario catalogue Greg Curnoe: Life & Stuff.